Mushroom Nutritional Value. List Of Value Added Services.

Mushroom Nutritional Value

    nutritional value

  • In terms of protein value, PAP offers significantly more than feed ingredients such as rape, lupin and soya.  Unlike vegetable proteins PAP is a complete feed ingredient, delivering valuable fats and minerals to rations.

    mushroom

  • A thing resembling a mushroom in shape
  • A pale pinkish-brown color
  • grow and spread fast; “The problem mushroomed”
  • pick or gather mushrooms; “We went mushrooming in the Fall”
  • common name for an edible agaric (contrasting with the inedible toadstool)
  • A fungal growth that typically takes the form of a domed cap on a stalk, often with gills on the underside of the cap

mushroom nutritional value

mushroom nutritional value – Mushrooms: Cultivation,

Mushrooms: Cultivation, Nutritional Value, Medicinal Effect, and Environmental Impact
Mushrooms: Cultivation, Nutritional Value, Medicinal Effect, and Environmental Impact
Since the publication of the first edition, important developments have emerged in modern mushroom biology and world mushroom production and products. The relationship of mushrooms with human welfare and the environment, medicinal properties of mushrooms, and the global marketing value of mushrooms and their products have all garnered great attention, identifying the need for an updated, authoritative reference.

Mushrooms: Cultivation, Nutritional Value, Medicinal Effect, and Environmental Impact, Second Edition presents the latest cultivation and biotechnological advances that contribute to the modernization of mushroom farming and the mushroom industry. It describes the individual steps of the complex mushroom cultivation process, along with comprehensive coverage of mushroom breeding, efficient cultivation practices, nutritional value, medicinal utility, and environmental impact. Maintaining the format, organization, and focus of the previous edition, this thoroughly revised edition includes the most recent research findings and many new references. It features new chapters on medicinal mushrooms and the effects of pests and diseases on mushroom cultivation. There are also updated chapters on specific edible mushrooms, and an expanded chapter on technology and mushrooms.

Rather than providing an encyclopedic review, this book emphasizes worldwide trends and developments in mushroom biology from an international perspective. It takes an interdisciplinary approach that will appeal to industrial and medical mycologists, mushroom growers, botanists, plant pathologists, and professionals and scientists in related fields. This book illustrates that mushroom cultivation has and will continue to have a positive global impact on long-term food nutrition, health care, environmental conservation and regeneration, and economic and social change.

" Mushrooms " !

" Mushrooms " !
Edible mushrooms are the fleshy and edible fruit bodies of several species of fungi. Mushrooms belong to the macrofungi, because their fruiting structures are large enough to be seen with the naked eye. They can appear either below ground (hypogeous) or above ground (epigeous) where they may be picked by hand.[1] Edibility may be defined by criteria that include absence of poisonous effects on humans and desirable taste and aroma.[2][3] Of the estimated 1.5 million species of fungi, only about 150 are considered toxic.[4]

Edible mushrooms are consumed by humans for their nutritional and occasionally medicinal value as comestibles. Mushrooms consumed for health reasons are known as medicinal mushrooms. While hallucinogenic mushrooms (e.g. Psilocybin mushrooms) are occasionally consumed for recreational or religious purposes, they can produce severe nausea and disorientation, and are therefore not commonly considered edible mushrooms.[5]

Edible mushrooms include many fungal species that are either harvested wild or cultivated. Easily cultivatable and common wild mushrooms are often available in markets, and those that are more difficult to obtain (such as the prized truffle and matsutake) may be collected on a smaller scale by private gatherers. Some preparations may render certain poisonous mushrooms fit for consumption.

Before assuming that any wild mushroom is edible, it should be identified. Proper identification of a species is the only safe way to ensure edibility. Some mushrooms that are edible for most people can cause allergic reactions in some individuals, and old or improperly stored specimens can cause food poisoning. Deadly poisonous mushrooms that are frequently confused with edible mushrooms and responsible for many fatal poisonings include several species of the Amanita genus, in particular, Amanita phalloides, the death cap.

Traditional Finnish Loggers food

Traditional Finnish Loggers food
This was a plater of traditional Loggers food we where told by that woman that served use in the restaurant. Suviko has kindly added notes to the different food types on display in the photo. I think that the meal was a bit pricey but hay it was a typical tourist restaurant.

mushroom nutritional value

Mushrooms: Cultivation, Nutritional Value, Medicinal Effect, and Environmental Impact, Second Edition
This new edition presents the latest cultivation and biotechnological advances that have contributed to the modernization of mushroom farming and the mushroom industry. It supplies each step in the complex mushroom cultivation process, exploring not only the “how” but also the “why”. Professionals/scientists in related fields will obtain a much greater knowledge of the nutritional and medicinal benefits that mushrooms have to offer. This interdisciplinary approach will appeal to readers in a wide range of fields with its complete coverage of breeding, efficient cultivation practices, nutritional value, and medicinal/pharmaceutical utility. “… [This book] forms a comprehensive and up-to-date source of information for all interested in edible and medicinal mushrooms and their cultivation.” – Peroonia, 2004 “…the personal practical experience, depth of knowledge, and enthusiasm of the authors shine in these chapters, which are to me the heart of the book…” – Mycological Research “If you are a mushroom enthusiast, you must have this complex book…” – Journal of Natural Products “To my knowledge, no past or current book comes closes to covering all the subjects considered in this book… – Solomon P. Wasser, in International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms, Vol. 6 “The authors provide the readers with complete information about mushroom species cultivated commercially, world production of mushrooms, and use of various agricultural and industrial wastes as substrates… Each valuable species of mushrooms is described in a thoroughly detailed manner. Several pages are devoted to each species with particular focus on the following subjects: Introduction, biological characteristics, requirements for mycelial growth, requirements for fruiting body foundation, cultivation methods, harvesting and processing, special cultivation practice, fruiting and liquid media (for same species), drying and storage, nutritional contents and medicinal properties (for same species), biological and compounds (for same species)… These chapters are very important. They contain complete information about modern cultivation and use of the most important culinary-medicinal mushrooms of the world. A very important conclusion for future readers can be found in the summary dedicated to species with regional appeal… The book is richly illustrated with more than 100 original photographs and figures. The book contains about 800 terms in the glossary, which is very useful, especially for amateurs and beginning scientists… The key difference between the new and the old version is that this latest edition has been expanded by more than 60%. Instead of eight chapters in the first edition, the new book contains 22 chapters… This is a well-written and thorough book…. I would strongly recommend this new edition of mushrooms without hesitation to industrial and medicinal mycologists, mushroom growers, botanists, plant pathologists, and professionals and scientists in related fields…. I will use this book extensively, both in teaching mycology to university students and in experimental work in my laboratory. The value of this book cannot be overestimated. The potentially extensive use of this book can be recognized in universities, classrooms, laboratories, etc. This book is useful for beginning students through PhD studies and beyond. This book is a real encyclopedia of mushroom biology including cultivation, nutritional value, medicinal value, and environmental impact.” – Solomon P. Wasser, in International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms, Volume 6